“You can make the argument that we are living in Peak Asshole”

This Stanford Professor Has a Theory on Why 2017 Is Filled With Jerks—Jessica Pressler; talking with Robert I Sutton about his books The No Asshole Rule and The Asshole Survival Guide.

“You can make the argument that we are living in Peak Asshole,” says Robert Sutton, a Stanford professor who, as the author of the iconic 2007 book The No Asshole Rule, is perhaps the world’s leading expert on the species. According to Sutton, the problem of “disrespectful, demeaning, and downright mean-spirited behavior” is “worse than ever,” which, while it may be bad news for humanity, is good news for The Asshole Survival Guide, the book Sutton came to New York to promote. And he has a point, citing the recent “fiascoes” at Uber and Fox News as examples of “assholes running wild.” Then, of course, there’s “the degeneration of American political discourse,” as Sutton delicately puts it. We are sitting, on a Monday afternoon in mid-September, in what may arguably be the red-hot center of an Asshole Heat Map, if one existed: the pink, veined lobby at the base of the colossal penis that is Trump Tower.

Crumbles at her word

I have this written down from back in 2003, but I didn’t note the source of the quote. Where is this from, I wonder?

“Her body, perfect temple of God, represents all the universe. The barrier between heaven and earth crumbles at her word.”

Religious Tolerance on Easter

“He was a god of ever-reviving vegetation. Born of a virgin, he died and was reborn annually. The festival began as a day of blood on Black Friday and culminated after three days in a day of rejoicing over the resurrection.”

“Wherever Christian worship of Jesus and Pagan worship of Attis were active in the same geographical area in ancient times, Christians ‘used to celebrate the death and resurrection of Jesus on the same date; and pagans and Christians used to quarrel bitterly about which of their gods was the true prototype and which the imitation.'”

“There were various male heroes within Egyptian, Greek, Indian, Roman and other pantheons of Gods, whose role was to be saviors to humanity — much like Jesus. In order to compete with those religions, Christianity would have had to describe Jesus in terms that matched or surpassed the legends and myths of other religions. Otherwise, it would not have survived.”